XBMC on Raspberry Pi 2

Raspberry Pi running OpenELEC with XBMCI got a Raspberry Pi 2 on the first day they were available in Australia. It has twice the memory and is up to six times faster than the old Raspberry Pi, and at some point in the future it will be able to run Windows 10. But in the mean-time, I thought it would be cool to see what sort of media centre appliance I could get going on a $36 computer. This post is for posterity, but also in case it helps others who are trying to get this working.

The default media centre platform is called XBMC, but the first thing I learnt was that it was now called Kodi. According to the Kodi Wiki, there are just two versions that work on the Pi 2. The first one I tried was OSMC, but it is still in Alpha release and not so stable. The other is OpenELEC and v5.0.3 supports the Pi 2.

Following the installation instructions didn’t work for me, perhaps running Windows 7 64-bit caused problems for the Win32 Disk Imager program. So, I tried using WinFLASHTool instead, and it worked for me perfectly.

This got me a media centre on the Pi, but what I really wanted was to be able to control it from the TV remote control – this requires HDMI CEC to work. I have an LG 42LN5710 television, and LG calls their implementation of CEC “Simplink”. There are two ways to turn it on: press the Simplink button on the remote, or press the Input source button on the remote and then the green button on the remote. Neither worked for me.

After a lot of stuffing around, I learned two things that got me on the right track.

Firstly, not every HDMI cable supports CEC. I had a cheap HDMI 1.3 cable that was fine for delivering A/V from the Pi to the TV, but I needed to replace it with a new cable. CEC is implemented in a single wire in the cable, and is apparently mandatory, but not mandatory enough.

Secondly, any HDMI device can communicate with any other HDMI device connected on any HDMI cable using CEC. I had three HDMI devices (including the Pi) plugged into my TV. One of them was misbehaving, and stopping CEC on the Pi from working. I had to unplug the rogue device and reboot the Pi.

After this, I was able to turn on Simplink and the TV identified the Pi as a Simplink device. Excellent!

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2 thoughts on “XBMC on Raspberry Pi 2”

  1. Hi Andrew, nice use case for the PI.
    Since you’re into node.js, have a look at The ThingBox Project – nice IOT framework for doing node-red on PI, another good one is Eclipse KURA.
    Rgds, Kevin

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